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Westport 'may not be there in 100 years'

The low-lying coastal township of 6000 is the hub of the Buller District, which sits between a mountain range to the east and the Tasman Sea to the west, and is bounded by two large rivers. The council is among others around the country already


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Westport 'may not be there in 100 years' - Radio New Zealand

The low-lying coastal township of 6000 is the hub of the Buller District, which sits between a mountain range to the east and the Tasman Sea to the west, and is bounded by two large rivers. The council is among others around the country already factoring in the consequences of higher tides and more extreme weather in their long-term planning. Councillor Phil Rutherford said it was impossible to ignore that the Tasman Sea was getting closer to Westport's coastal fringes. At a council meeting last week, when the talk turned to planning for some big-ticket items, Mr Rutherford suggested it might be pointless without some radical thinking such as moving the town further inland. "My comment was, 'why would we build something for 100 years to service a town that may not be there in 100 years'. Mayor Garry Howard said Westport had some features that made it more susceptible to the effects of climate change. "Westport is surrounded by the Orowaiti and the Buller rivers, and the sea on the front. We are seeing changes in climate and we are facing the same coastal problem that many towns around New Zealand are facing," he said. A 2016 Ministry for the Environment report shows that sea levels on the West Coast rose fractionally each year throughout last century. By the year 2090 the region can expect temperatures to rise by up to 3°C, and coastal roads and infrastructure may face increased risk from erosion and flooding. Mr Rutherford, who has been in Westport since the 1970s, said there was no question things were changing, regardless of any view as to why that might be. "Is it a result of climate change - that's the $64 million question, but I closely follow... Councillors have been told that the lack of rain this year means the Buller River has not flushed out the sandbar and it is higher than usual. Long-time Westport fisherman Curly James said it meant larger boats could only cross at the top of the tide. He said the shallower the water over a sandbar, the bigger the waves breaking over it. "You've got that problem and you've also got the problem of hitting the bottom. Mr James said the Buller River could usually be relied on to help keep the bar at reasonable depths, but more frequent patterns of heavy southerly ocean swells had combined to make the bar unusually shallow. The large seas deposit huge quantities of sand that build up at the harbour entrance, but the lack of dredging since the closure of Holcim Cement is also to blame for the problem, he said. I heard someone say the other day that there's so little water on the bar now, that the dredge couldn't even work there if it wanted to. At high tide there's not enough water - the dredge would only be able to work on the big tides," Mr James said. Garry Howard said some serious thinking was needed around how vulnerable Westport might be to rising sea levels, and how it might plan.

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  1. The low-lying coastal township of 6000 is the hub of the Buller District, which sits between a mountain range to the east and the Tasman Sea to the west, and is bounded by two large rivers. The council is among others around the country already
  2. Redvers was the second son and eventual heir of James Wentworth Buller MP for Exeter. After completing his schooling at Eton he was commissioned into the 60th Rifles. He served in the Second Opium War and was promoted captain before taking part in 
  3. “We were starting to click,” said North attackman/midfielder James Avanzato, a Maryland commit from Lake Grove, N.Y. “We were playing unselfish lacrosse, and we were just having fun. When you're playing with guys like Navy commit Nate Buller soon
  1. Hearty congrats to the wonderful baritone James D. Rodriguez, who has been newly appointed as director of the... https://t.co/DYqCfCZODe

Cooking

James Beard's Chicken Kiev (chicken, butter, chives, eggs, flour, garlic, parsley, black pepper, rosemary, salt, vegetable oil, water)

Catfish Saint James (baking powder, butter, mustard powder, flour, garlic powder, italian seasoning, onion powder, parmesan cheese, salt)

James' Fire Salad (black pepper, jalapeno, lettuce, red onions, tomato)

Dinner for Two, Please James! (black pepper, tarragon, garlic, shrimp, lemon juice, olive oil, onions, oregano, parmesan cheese, pasta, red wine, roma tomato)

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Redvers Buller - Wikipedia
Redvers was the second son and eventual heir of James Wentworth Buller (1798–1865), of Downes, MP for Exeter, by his wife Charlotte Juliana Jane Howard-Molyneux ...

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L - Historical Bristol Street Directory 1871
Mathews' Bristol Street Directory 1871 Lamb Court, 3, Lamb Street, College Street Lamb Court, Temple Street Lamb Court, Redcliff Lamb Court, Jacobs Wells Lamb Street, College Street J . Perrott & Co. coach builders Henry Jones, boot maker Samuel Powell Sarah Powell James Marshall Charles Morse, brazier. ?. Stukes, carpenter (Lamb Street Lower) William Martin, chimney sweeper George Ball, grocer William George Ranks, farrier George Knowles Charles Cox Temperance Mission Room Sarah Ball, shopkeeper Robert Peglar vict, Ship Tavern (pub) 1852 - 78 Robert Peglar / 1881 - 87 Mary Ann Peglar / 1888 - 1904 Elizabeth Mary Peglar / 1906 Elizabeth Harding. Lamb Street, New Street to Wade Street, St Philip’s (Without - outside the old city walls, Lawford's Gate) www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/2071501181/ St. Jude's Church, Rev. William Kerry, incumbent. Built on the site of the Bullring, St Jude's church was erected in 1844-49 to the designs of S.B.Gabriel. It stands...
CL - Historical Bristol Street Directory 1871
Mathews' Bristol Street Directory 1871 Clare Road, Victoria Road, Cotham George James Smith, Lindsay villa Charles Anthony Hensler, Black Forest villa Sebastian Smith John Looker George Acutt Charles Eustance Mrs Stone William Griffin, Charlton villa Frederick Smith, Kerry villa Mrs Mary Weston Mrs Hannah Shipley Henry Mawbey Thomas Woodhouse, Glenusk Clare Street, Corn Street to Drawbridge William and Freerick Morgan, stationers David Glass & Co. tobacconists Mary Ann Wetherman, Berlin warehouse Charles William Bragge, public-accountant Evans & Hancock, marine assurance agents Sam. J. Kepple, china & glass warehouse S J Kepple & Son, 3 Clare Street (China and Glass) In October Samuel James Kepple was injured, during building repairs at his premises, by a large beam that fell through the skylight inflicting a scalp wound. He was taken to the Infirmary where his wound was dressed by Mr Haarant and then went back to his home, Etruria Villa, Southfield Road,...
Tales of the Blue Bowl at Hanham
During the 1940s war years, each Friday morning whatever the weather Mr Charles Jenkins would arrive at the Bottom Bar of the Blue Bowl at Hanham. He lived at Pipley bottom near Upton Cheyney and came to Hanham every week ,transported by his pony and two-wheeled light cart, to swap over his accumulator at Harold Caswell’s shop and get his week’s grocery. There was no electricity at Pipley Bottom and without a charged accumulator he could not listen to his wireless set. Landlord George Elliott was grateful to him for a regular supply of rabbit and pheasant during the time of food rationing and in tum Mr Jenkins was allowed a quantity of cider to satisfy him until the following Friday. The customers of the 1930-1940 era, and indeed later, were a mixed bunch but in spite of the regular public house banter and fun they all knew that the landlord George Arthur Elliott was in charge. One regular was seriously rebuked for taking advantage of a gentleman who was somewhat disabled. He...

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